Announcements

Adanti Student Center Ballroom, 1-4 p.m.

• Meet prospective employers
• Discover career possibilities
• Dress like you mean business!

Each year the Academic and Career Advising Center holds a career fair that bring national and regional employers representing all fields to the Southern campus. The fairs foster student and employer interaction while offering students the opportunity to explore various careers, learn about organizations and industries, and apply for full-time, part-time, internship, and cooperative education opportunities.

Good afternoon everyone!

As we are all well aware of by now, we have been experiencing some extremely cold temperatures.  In order to protect our facilities and ultimately faculty and staff personal space, we need your help in making sure all windows are closed in offices and classrooms.  Since many of our buildings have units located on outside walls, it is extremely important to make sure windows are closed so piping won’t freeze.

Last weekend we found several windows open in both classrooms and offices.   Had we not been on Campus doing snow removal these areas might not have been discovered and frozen pipes could very well have caused serious water damage.

Please take a moment to check for open windows in your areas, and thank you for your assistance.

Robert G. Sheeley
Associate Vice President for Capital Budgeting & Facilities Operations
Southern Connecticut State University
sheeleyr1@southernct.edu
Phone:  203-392-6050
Fax:  203-392-6058

President Papazian will host a University Dialogue on Tuesday, March 3 at 12:30 p.m. in the Adanti Student Center Theater.

Please join the President and members of her Cabinet to discuss issues of interest to the campus community.

Dear Colleagues,

I am very pleased to announce that Dr. Troy Paddock, chair of the History Department, has been named as the recipient of the 2014 Faculty Scholar Award.

Troy, who is an expert on German history, was chosen by a committee of his peers for his book, “Creating the Russian Peril: Education, the Public Sphere and National Identity in Imperial Germany, 1890-1914.”

Rex Gilliland, Chair of the Faculty Scholar Award Committee, said committee members were impressed by Troy’s “breadth of scholarship and the innovative methodology that he developed and employed.

“We also noted the fact that he addressed a neglected issue in historical research and questioned widely-held assumptions about the development of public attitudes in Imperial Germany,” Rex wrote. “The importance of his work for the field was evidenced by several detailed and fascinating reviews of his book.”

Troy’s book — published in March 2010 by Camden House of Rochester, N.Y. — explores the German perception of Russia in the years before World War I, which is a topic of some debate. Drawing on extensive scholarly research conducted in several German cities, his work explores how Russia was presented in various books, newspapers, and academic writings.

Several reviewers praised Troy’s contribution to an important topic that has been little-discussed in the English-speaking world.

As Andrew Donson, a University of Massachusetts Amherst scholar, wrote in The American Historical Review: “The book’s main argument – that the image of Russia created by German historians and journalists was largely a foil for their own concerns about Germany, their reflection in a panoptic mirror – is sharp and illuminating. It is commendable that, rather than writing a purely intellectual history, Paddock traces the transmission of this image from experts to school textbooks and the press.”

As a result of his book, Troy has been invited to participate in a multi-volume project, “Russia in the Great War and Revolution.” He also edited “World War I and Propaganda,” published by Brill in 2014 and the 2004 book, “A Call to Arms: Propaganda, Public Opinion and Newspapers in the Great War,” published by Praeger.

Troy, who has taught at Southern since 1998 and was promoted to full professor in 2008, was the recipient of that year’s Connecticut State University System Board of Trustees Research Award.

On behalf of the university community, I congratulate him on this latest accolade, which is a fitting recognition of the depth and impact of his scholarly work. I thank the committee for their successful deliberations, and am also pleased to note that there were 13 applicants for the 2014 Faculty Scholar Award. This was the largest applicant pool in several years, reflecting the breadth and quality of scholarly endeavors by our Southern faculty.

Sincerely yours,
Mary A. Papazian, Ph.D.
President

As the CDC continues to monitor and respond to the recent ebola concerns, please be assured that SCSU is remaining informed through local and state health authorities.  We currently have no university-sponsored trips where students or faculty are coming to campus from the affected areas.  There are no university-sponsored study abroad trips in the affected areas.  Any students that require medical care for any reason are being properly screened for travel history and symptoms of concern.  We have no reason to believe that our campus community has any heightened reason for alarm.

Since we are beginning to enter the season for other illnesses such as influenza, the usual methods to prevent infection remain important including handwashing.  However, the ebola virus cannot be transmitted through the air, through water or through food.  It can only be transmitted through fluids of an infected person or from exposure to contaminated objects – such as needles.  Body fluids include blood, sweat, urine, feces, saliva and possibly nasal secretions if close to the infected person.

Any person with recent international travel to affected areas separate from university-sponsored travel should monitor their health status for three weeks after arrival from West Africa. Taking your temperature once or twice daily might be helpful. If you have traveled to West Africa and develop sudden fever, chills, muscle aches, severe diarrhea, vomiting, rash or other symptoms consistent with Ebola, you should seek immediate medical attention.  When traveling to a health-care provider, limit contact with other people and avoid all other travel.

Maintain good healthy practices like getting plenty of sleep, maintaining good nutrition, drinking plenty of water and increasing your physical activity to help your immune system best resist infections.

SCSU is committed to ensuring the health and wellness of our community and will keep you updated in the event of any changes.

Dr. Diane S. Morgenthaler, MD
Director SCSU Health and Wellness
Granoff Health Center
501 Crescent Street
New Haven, CT 06515
(203) 392-6300 phone
(203) 392-6301 fax