Yearly Archives: 2016

It has already been 19 days since I arrived in Liverpool, and with each passing day I feel more and more comfortable here. During my first week, I struggled with a brief bout of jet lag which saw me awake and asleep at all the wrong times, but I have long since conquered that. Overall, I have been able to adjust to life in a new city quite well.

During the first week I was here alone, so I explored the city by myself on foot. I was able to enjoy the great end-of-summer weather that there was in early September. I saw the waterfront and the Albert Dock, where I spent hours looking out across the River Mersey to the Wirral Peninsula on the other side and enjoying the breeze. I saw both of the huge cathedrals that the city is home to, the Metropolitan and the Anglican. I found my school, about a 15 minute walk from my residence accomodation. I found the Echo Arena. I found the Bombed Out Church from World War II. I found St. George’s Hall (which was used as a filming location for the upcoming Harry Potter spin-off) and dozens of other gorgeous buildings and landmarks.

As I explored the city, a wonderful thing began to happen. Rather than needing to use my phone as a map all of the time, I could recognize my location by sight and navigate through memory. It is an extrordinary thing to learn your way around in a new city, and it is one of the best ways to feel more at home in that city. Not feeling lost all of the time goes a long way toward not feeling out of place. Besides just learning the streets, there were a few other things which required getting used to. The money is different, they use many more coins here than in the U.S. They drive on the opposite side of the road, so I have to remember to look the opposite way when crossing the street. They use different terms, for example “Cheers” means thank you and they call courses “modules”, among many others. It is truly enjoyable to learn and adapt to these differences, and it gives me a great sense of appreciation for the culture of this place.

After a little over a week of living by myself, my flat-mates arrived. They are all fellow SCSU students, and they are all great people. Two of them, Erica Surgeary and Shannon O’Malley are also keeping blogs which you should check out as well. All of us get along great, and it is nice to have others in the same situation learning how to live in this great city together.

Our first major outing as a group was to a food festival in a local park. There were hundreds of stands with foods from all different cultures. I had the interesting opportunity to try a zebra burger which, somewhat surprisingly, was quite good. We have also gone to a pub in the city center to watch the Liverpool F.C. match versus Chelsea. There were hundreds of joyous Liverpool fans singing together as they defeated their competitors. This was a somewhat foreign environment for me personally as a Chelsea supporter, but it was impossible not to enjoy the electryfing environment.

The people here have been nothing but kind, welcoming, and helpful. I have already met and made friends with people from all over the UK, from Ireland, from the Netherlands, from Romania, from Hungary, from France, from Italy, from China, and from India, all come to study here in Liverpool. Indeed, Liverpool is a great student city. It is accessible, safe, cheap, and full of things to do. It is striking how similar we all are despite our different backgrounds, and the world feels just a little bit smaller for it.

Classes finally begin tomorrow, Monday the 26th of September, after a week of registration and introductory information. I am looking forward to studying Shakespeare, British literature, and fiction writing here at LJMU. I can’t wait to meet all of my professors and my classmates. Here’s to a good semester!

Chris Rowland

SCSU at Big Ben

October 7th – 9th, 2016

September 14th – 25th, 2016

I can’t believe it’s been just over a week since I arrived to my new home! Everyday I’ve been enriched by the beauty of the city, the dynamic culture, and of course, brilliant English accents. (cheers mate!) In my short time here I can already see that Liverpool is a dynamic city that is perfect for university students. There are tons of free museums, art galleries, and restaurants, a very lively nightlife, and countless of food options to choose from.

I had the best Indian food the other night!

This past week I’ve been exploring the city with my 5 other flatmates, all from SCSU. We live in the same flat but we each have our own room and toilet (that’s what they call a bathroom!). We share a large kitchen & living room space where we find ourselves each evening drinking tea and chatting about our daily adventures, telling old stories, and playing cards. We’ve also made good friends with our neighbors, especially the flat above ours who are all lads from England, Ireland, and Wales! Their accents are sometimes hard to understand, especially scousers; which are Liverpool natives that speak a different and fast pace style of English. I find myself saying “I’m sorry, can you repeat that?” too many times throughout the day, but everyone here is so genuine and kind that they don’t mind repeating themselves.

As seen in my video, I’ve taken the bus numerous times to get to IM Marsh campus at John Moores University (I’ll post more about LJMU next week). So don’t worry, I’m not just here on holiday (vacation) for four months. My modules (classes) don’t start until Monday, September 26th! However, I had “Induction Week”, which is similar to new student orientation. I’ve been enrolling in my Event Management courses and learning the ropes of what it means to be a Uni student in Liverpool.

One thing, of many many things, that has surprised me was that I was going to be with Event Management freshers (freshmen) during Induction Week. Just like me, they are new to the city. It was a relief that I wasn’t just a blue fish standing out of water, well, until I say something and people realize I am an American!

Surprisingly, the most frequent question I’ve been asked is if I’ve seen celebrities!

I’ve made friends with people from all over the UK and they tell me how much they love my accent; how crazy is that?! Sometimes I feel like a celebrity because anytime I speak, all eyes turn to the “American in the room” but it gets better then that… When anyone asks where in America I am from, I say New York (sadly no one really knows where Connecticut is)  their eyes light up and smile instantly. I’ve noticed their excitement is not about where I am from but it’s that I’ve simply seen New York City before!

The majority of my blog posts will be featured via video. If you’re viewing/reading this post as a Southern Owl or LJMU student, and are interested in the exchange program, I hope you keep following me on this adventure! You can also email me anytime at ericasurgeary@gmail.com if you have questions.

 

Well, that’s it for now mates, until next week, wish me luck on my first week of modules!

 

Signing off,

– AmErica n’ Liverpool.

 

CARE, New Haven

Above, left to right: Yan Searcy, associate dean of the School of Health and Human Services; Sandra Bulmer, dean of the School of Health and Human Services; Alycia Santilli, CARE director; and Jeannette Ickovics, CARE founder

The Community Alliance for Research and Engagement (CARE) is partnering with Southern Connecticut State University to enhance its ongoing efforts to improve the health of residents in New Haven’s lowest-income neighborhoods.

Since its founding in 2007 at the Yale School of Public Health, CARE has worked to identify solutions to health challenges such as diabetes, asthma, and heart and lung diseases through community-based research and projects focusing on social, environmental, and behavioral risk factors. During the next three years, CARE will transition from Yale to SCSU’s campus, with SCSU becoming responsible for CARE’s community engagement work. Yale will continue to manage and finance CARE’s research agenda while gradually shifting that work to SCSU.

“This partnership with SCSU represents a powerful next step in the evolution of CARE by engaging with a local state university to drive deeper change into our neighborhoods,” said CARE founder Jeannette Ickovics. “This is an opportunity of mutual benefit:  a way to extend CARE’s work in New Haven, provide continuity and new energy to the work, and provide a platform to launch a center at Southern. “

The new SCSU Center for Community Engagement will help foster student service learning, advance community-engaged scholarship, and benefit CARE’s community partners, said Sandra Bulmer, dean of SCSU’s School of Health and Human Services (HHS). With Alycia Santilli as director, and Ickovics serving in an advisory capacity, CARE is beginning its transition to SCSU this month, Bulmer said.

Southern’s School of Health and Human Services is unique in Connecticut in combining seven disciplines under a single umbrella –  communication disorders, exercise science, marriage and family therapy, nursing, public health, social work, and recreation, tourism, and sport management. As a result, academic opportunities are highly interdisciplinary, while the school’s wide range of internships means that students participate in the community while earning their degrees.

“SCSU’s students and faculty are tremendous assets that will bring CARE expanded opportunities in community-based research, programming, and policy change, leading to further improvement in the health of New Haven residents,” Bulmer said.

During the transitional period, YSPH will remain as the central hub of CARE’s research activities, with a focus on data analysis from its New Haven Public Schools and neighborhood health surveys, said Santilli, who began her employment with SCSU Sept. 23 as a special appointment faculty member in the Department of Public Health.

“The potential of student, faculty, and staff power, combined with the legacy of work initiated over the past decade at the Yale School of Public Health, will be leveraged in a new way that I hope will have a lasting impact for another decade to come,” Santilli said.

“I am excited about the capacity and resources that this expanded partnership can bring to the SCSU campus community and the Greater New Haven area. As I become familiar with SCSU, two things stand out: the drive to best serve students and the commitment to social justice. These are simultaneously familiar and fresh perspectives from which CARE can begin to refine our focus on improving health in the New Haven community.”

Santilli, who has been with CARE since 2007, will spend the coming months transitioning CARE’s operations to Southern’s campus, developing CARE’s new strategic plan, and launching its new community engagement activities. She will split her time between offices at Lang House and Southern on the Green in downtown New Haven.

More information about CARE, including its accomplishments and publications, can be found on the CARE website.

The university is pleased to welcome 22 new tenure-track faculty members to Southern this academic year. Together, they bring a variety of skills and backgrounds to the institution that will serve to enhance not only Southern’s academic offerings but also enrich the campus community.

girard2Alex Girard, assistant professor of art, joins Southern’s faculty after serving as an assistant professor of graphic design at the University of Minnesota – Duluth. He holds an M.F.A. in graphic design from the Rochester Institute of Technology in Rochester, N.Y. He also has a B.A. in graphic design and painting from the University of Northern Iowa in Cedar Falls, Iowa. He was previously an associate dean of academic affairs at the Community College of Aurora, Colorado, and is a freelance graphic designer.

 

bakerSarah Wojiski, assistant professor of biology, comes to Southern after more than five years at MCPHS University (formerly known as Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Services). She holds a Ph.D. in genetics from Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. She also has an M.Ed. in secondary education and biology from Boston College, and a B.S. in diagnostic genetic sciences from the University of Connecticut, where she graduated summa cum laude. Her research includes the area of cancer, particularly leukemia.

grimesSara Baker, assistant professor of communication, joins us at Southern following an appointment as a course mentor at Western Governors University in Salt Lake City. She holds a Ph.D. in organizational communication from the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. She also has an M.A. in communication studies from San Diego State University, and a B.A. in communication studies from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. She was previously an assistant professor of communication studies at Eastern Illinois University. Her research includes the role of gender, sex and sexuality in communication.

Mohammad Tariqul Islam, assistant professor of computer science, comes to Southern after serving as a teaching and research assistant at the University of Kentucky. He holds a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Kentucky, where he also holds a master’s degree (en passant) in computer science. He has a B.Sc. in computer science in engineering from Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology. His research includes geo-facial image analysis.

fureyRachel Furey, assistant professor of English, joins us at Southern after serving as a writing instructor and fiction specialist at Lincoln University in Jefferson City, Mo. She holds a Ph.D. in English from Texas Tech University. She also has an M.F.A. in creative writing from Southern Illinois University, and a B.S. in English from State University of New York, College at Brockport. Her works – both fiction and non-fiction – have appeared in many publications.

 

millerMatthew Miller, assistant professor of the environment, geography and marine sciences, becomes a tenure-track faculty member after serving last year as a visiting assistant professor at Southern. He holds a Ph.D. in biogeography from the University of Georgia, where he also holds an M.S. in biogeography. In addition, he has a B.A. in geography from University of Vermont. He previously had been a visiting assistant professor at Oklahoma State University, and had an earlier stint as a visiting assistant professor at Southern in 2010-11.

smithJason Smith, assistant professor of history, joins Southern after serving for the last two years as a post-doctoral fellow at the U.S. Naval Academy. He holds a Ph.D. in history from Temple University in Philadelphia. He also has a B.A. in history from West Chester University of Pennsylvania. He previously had been an adjunct instructor in the social sciences at Howard Community College in Columbia, Md. His research expertise includes U.S. naval science.

 

Vern WilliamsVern Williams, assistant professor of journalism, becomes a tenure-track faculty member after serving two consecutive one-year special appointments at Southern. He holds an M.P.S. in communication from Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y. He also has a B.F.A. in photographic illustration from Rochester Institute of Technology. He previously served as director of multimedia and photography at the New Haven Register.

 

Jennifer Hopper, assistant professor of political science, joins Southern after serving for five years as an assistant professor of political science at Washington College in Chestertown, Md. She holds a Ph.D. in political science from City University of New York. She also has a B.S. in political science from Hunter College in New York, where she graduated summa cum laude. Among her areas of expertise is media coverage of the presidency.

ramachandarSujini Ramachandar, assistant professor of communication disorders, joins Southern after teaching and conducting research as a doctoral student at the University of Pittsburgh. She holds an M.S. in speech-language pathology from Syracuse University in Syracuse, N.Y., and a B.S. in accounting from Madras University in Coimbatore, India. She previously served as a speech-language pathologist at the DePaul School for Hearing and Speech.

 

bereiCatherine Berei, assistant professor of exercise science, comes to Southern after serving as a temporary lecturer in physical education teacher education at the University of Idaho. She holds a Ph.D. in sport and exercise science from the University of Northern Colorado. She also has an M.Ed. in health education and a B.S. in physical education from Plymouth State University in Plymouth, N.H. Among her areas of expertise is comprehensive physical activities in schools.

 

Andrea Adimando, assistant professor of nursing, becomes a tenure-track faculty member following two consecutive one-year special appointments at Southern. She holds a D.N.P. from Chatham University in Pittsburgh. She also has an M.S. in human nutrition from the University of Bridgeport, an M.S.N. from the Yale University School of Nursing and a B.S. in behavioral neuroscience from Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Penn. She previously had served as an A.P.R.N. in child psychiatric emergency services at the Yale-New Haven Children’s Hospital.

Frances Penny, assistant professor of nursing, comes to Southern after a year as an adjunct clinical faculty member at the University of Connecticut. She holds an M.S.N. from the University of Connecticut. She also has an M.P.H. from Johns Hopkins University and a B.S.N. from Georgetown University. She previously has worked as a nurse in various hospitals along the East Coast and in California.

contrufoRaymond Contrufo, assistant professor of recreation, tourism, and sport management, joins Southern after two years as an assistant professor of sport management at State University of New York College at Cortland. He holds a Ph.D. in kinesiology from the University of Connecticut. He also has an M.S. in sport management from California University of Pennsylvania, as well as a B.A. in French from the University of Connecticut and a B.S. in industrial engineering from Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Worcester, Mass. He previously served in sales and marketing positions with minor league baseball programs.

mcginnisKevin McGinniss, assistant professor of recreation, tourism, and sport management, joins Southern after serving as president and CEO of the Eastern College Athletic Conference. He holds an Ed.D. in sport administration/sport and physical education pedagogy from Columbia University Teachers College. He also has a Sixth Year Professional Diploma in educational leadership, an M.S. in physical education/athletics administration and a B.S. in health education from Southern. A former director of alumni affairs at Southern, he returns to his alma mater after 15 years.

Paul LevatinoPaul Levatino, assistant professor of social work, becomes a tenure-track faculty member following a series of special appointments at Southern. He holds an M.F.T. and a B.S. in computer science from Southern. He previously served as program coordinator for Wheeler Clinic’s Multidimensional Family Therapy Program.

 

 

hoffler

Steve Hoffler, assistant professor of social work, becomes a tenure-track faculty member after having taught at Southern for six years. He holds a Ph.D. in social work from Smith College in Northampton, Mass. He also has an M.S.W. and a B.A. in history from the University of Connecticut. In addition, he has served as a consultant with the state Department of Children and Families.

 

 

James Aselta, assistant professor of accounting, joins Southern after retiring from Ernst & Young as a management consultant and audit executive. He holds an M.B.A. and a B.S. in accounting from Fairleigh Dickinson University in Teaneck, N.J. He served as a visiting instructor last year for the University of Hartford, where he taught financial accounting and auditing concepts.

richardsonAnthony Richardson, assistant professor of management/management information systems, becomes a tenure-track faculty member following a pair of one-year special appointments at Southern. He holds an M.S. in management from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, N.Y., and a B.S. in management information systems from Central Connecticut State University. He has served as a project manager for Hartford Healthcare.

 

Robert Smith, assistant professor of management/management information systems, joins Southern after serving as an adjunct faculty member at Lincoln College of New England, located in Southington. He operates his own law practice and holds a J.D. from Quinnipiac University in Hamden. He also has a B.A. in psychology from Central Connecticut State University.

Natalie Starling, assistant professor of counseling and school psychology, comes to Southern after serving as a psychological and behavioral consultant for EASTCONN Regional Educational Services. She holds a Ph.D. in school psychology from the University of Connecticut. She also has a Sixth Year Professional Diploma in school psychology and an M.S. in school psychology from Southern. In addition, she has a B.A. in school psychology from the University of Connecticut. She previously served as a contract school psychologist for the Meriden Public Schools.

bogelGayle Bogel, associate professor of information and library science, becomes a tenure-track faculty member following a one-year special appointment at Southern. She holds a Ph.D. in interdisciplinary information science from the University of North Texas. She also has an M.L.S. from Southern, an M.A. in education from Sacred Heart University in Fairfield, and a B.A. from California State University. She previously worked as director of the educational technology program at Fairfield University.

 

 

Tobacco- and vape-free campus

The state Department of Public Health has awarded Southern a grant for $235,496 to enhance its leadership role in snuffing out campus tobacco use and to encourage its students to kick the habit.

The grant comes a year after SCSU became a tobacco-free campus, which means tobacco use in all its forms – as well as the use of e-cigarettes – are prohibited on all campus property. Southern was the first public university in Connecticut to make that transformation.

The grant will enable the university to:

*Train students to become tobacco-free “ambassadors,” who will help connect tobacco users to services that can help them quit. A part-time, tobacco-use cessation coordinator will be hired to oversee this program, as well as assist with other cessation programs.

*Provide technical assistance and training to other Connecticut public universities that are interested in becoming tobacco-free.

*Expand tobacco-cessation services on campus. Counseling and nicotine replacement medications will be among the services offered.

“Southern is proud to be the first public university in Connecticut to go tobacco-free, and this grant will allow us to collaborate with our sister schools to improve the health and safety of more students,” said Emily Rosenthal, coordinator of the SCSU Wellness Center.

“We are happy with the improvements on campus since we implemented the policy a year ago,” she said “But we also are seeing some positive results in our students’ tobacco-use off-campus, as well.”

Rosenthal said the percentage of male students who identified themselves as casual smokers (any use within 10 days of taking the survey) dropped from 26 percent in 2014 to 17 percent in 2016. Casual female smokers dipped from 14 to 13 percent during that same period.

In addition, use of electronic vapor devices also dropped. Male students who said they had been vaping within 30 days of the survey plummeted from 17 percent in 2014 to 9 percent in 2016. Vaping by female students also fell from 9 percent in 2014 to 3 percent in 2016.

“We also found that before we came a tobacco-free campus, Southern was slightly above the national average in terms of the percentage of our students who were regular smokers,” Rosenthal said. “But now we are slightly below average. We still have work to do, but we are headed in the right direction, and I have to believe becoming a tobacco-free campus is helping encourage tobacco users to quit.”

Dr. Diane Morgenthaler, SCSU director of health and wellness, agreed. “Southern has made great strides in moving forward our tobacco-free campus initiative over the past year. We look forward to continuing the progress. This grant will help us accomplish that goal.”

Physics, Evan Finch

Evan Finch wants to get to the heart of the matter – “strange quark matter,” that is.

The assistant professor of physics at Southern and expert on particle/nuclear physics has been researching whether this theoretically enigmatic type of matter exists. If proven, scientists believe it could hold the keys to unlocking many mysteries of the universe.

While the Earth is made up of atoms, which form “visible matter,” a larger portion of the universe is believed to be made up of “dark matter,” which does not emit light and is invisible. But physicists theorize that another type of matter – called strange quark matter, or “strangelets” – is part of creation, as well.

It has yet to be proven, but if it exists, scientists say it would be much heavier than visible matter, likely thousands of times as dense. It could be one of the building blocks of neutron stars, and it could even be responsible for influencing the space-time continuum.

“So far, every test for strange matter has come back negative,” Finch said. “But it can’t be ruled out, and in fact, many physicists believe it exists. Over time, I’ve become less optimistic that it exists. But we certainly can’t rule it out. There is sound theoretical science behind its possible existence.”

Crab Nebula
Optical: NASA/HST/ASU/J. Hester et al. X-Ray: NASA/CXC/ASU/J. Hester et al.

Finch has been part of a team of scientists involved with the use of an Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) for the International Space Station. The AMS measures the level of cosmic rays in the atmosphere, which is important information needed to prepare for a manned flight to Mars by NASA in the next 20 years or so. But the AMS also can detect strange matter, as well as dark matter.

The AMS was installed on the space station in 2011. Finch said it is more likely to capture strange matter at the station, than on Earth.

Finch, now in his third year of teaching at SCSU, brought two students interested in particle physics – Richard Magnotti and Michael Schriefer — to the Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island during the summer for three short trips. During the trip, the students sought to troubleshoot a small detector that is used as part of the lab’s Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, which recreates conditions that are believed to have existed in the first millionth of a second after the Big Bang. The Big Bang is the most commonly held theory by scientists in terms of what ignited the start of the universe. Finch said the collider is the second largest in the world.

“While we weren’t able to find out the cause of a problem in the detector, we were able to re-purpose it,” Finch said.

The European Organization for Nuclear Research, known as CERN, is a research organization that operates the largest particle physics laboratory in the world. Located in Geneva, its Large Hydron Collider is where the Higgs boson particle, sometimes called the “God particle,” was proven in 2012.

CSU Professor Terry Bynam

Terrell “Terry” Ward Bynum, professor of philosophy at Southern and founder of SCSU’s Research Center on Computing and Society, has been selected for one of the most prestigious faculty awards within the Connecticut State Colleges and Universities system.

The state Board of Regents for Higher Education Friday bestowed Bynum with the title of CSU (Connecticut State University) professor. Southern, Central, Western and Eastern Connecticut State universities each can have up to three such professors. Bynum fills an SCSU vacancy left by the recent retirement of James Mazur, who was named as a CSU Professor in 2010. Bynum joins Southern’s current CSU Professor, Vivian Shipley, who is a professor of English. A third CSU Professor at Southern, Joseph Solodow, recently retired, leaving a vacancy.

“Dr. Bynum has a very impressive career at Southern,” said Ellen Durnin, SCSU provost and vice president for academic affairs. “He has played a leading role in the field of computer ethics and is internationally regarded as the most prominent teacher and theoretician in the field.”

In addition to launching the Research Center on Computing and Society, Bynum organized and hosted the first international computer ethics conference in 1991. The event was funded by the National Science Foundation.

He received the inaugural INSEIT/Joseph Weizenbaum Award in information and computer ethics in 2009 during the International Conference of Computer Ethics: Philosophical Enquiry. The award was presented for making significant contributions to the field of information and computer ethics through research, service and vision. And earlier that year, he was chosen as the recipient of the American Philosophical Association’s Barwise Prize for his life-long work on computing and human values.

Bynum is an accomplished author, having written his first book, “Gottlieb Frege, Conceptual Notation and Related Articles,” about a noted German philosopher. Oxford University Press would eventually republish the book as an Oxford Scholarly Classic, according to Troy Paddock, chairman of the CSU Professor Advisory Committee.

Bynum would go on to write books on computer ethics, as well.
“He is considered to be, by more than one scholar, the ‘founding father’ of the field,” Paddock said.

He established the American Association of Philosophy Teachers and has conducted more than two dozen teaching workshops, Paddock said. He also created the Computer Ethics course at Southern and has taught in the SCSU Honors College.

Bynum began teaching at SCSU in 1987 and holds a Ph.D. in philosophy from City University of New York.

Jim Barber, Distinguished Alumnus Award, 2016

For more than 50 years, James Barber ‘64, M.S. ’79, has given dedicated service to Southern Connecticut State University and its students. He was recognized by the SCSU Alumni Association with its 2016 Distinguished Alumnus Award on Friday, Sept. 9 at a campus event attended by more than 300 family members, friends, and fellow alumni.

A record-setting hurdler as a student athlete, Barber went on to become a successful Owls coach for almost 25 years, training numerous track champions and many All-Americans. His expertise also saw him coach both the men’s and women’s USA track teams at national and international championships.

In 1971, Barber launched Southern’s first Summer Educational Opportunity Program, which over time successfully opened the door to a college degree for scores of minority students. He also led the university’s affirmative action office, served as director of student supportive services for more than 20 years, and now helps to advance Southern’s mission as director of community engagement.

A committed community activist, he founded New Haven’s track and field outreach program for young people, working with more than 4,000 children and youth over the years. And he has served as president and a long-time board member of the New Haven Scholarship Fund, which has assisted generations of local high school students to pay for a college education.

“Unsurprisingly, you are a legend in New Haven, having inspired and mentored generations of city youth,” said Connecticut Gov. Dannel P. Malloy, in a citation honoring Barber.  “And at Southern, your influence both on and off the field has impacted students and alumni nationwide, many of whom say they would never have graduated without your support and guidance.

“Your many contributions are being recognized today with the 2016 Distinguished Alumnus Award – a fitting recognition for a true Southern icon and a worthy member of the Nutmeg State.”

View a video tribute to James Barber.

View a photo gallery from the Distinguished Alumnus Award event.