Political Science Prof Offers Insight into Supreme Court Ruling on ‘Faithless Electors’

Political Science Prof Offers Insight into Supreme Court Ruling on ‘Faithless Electors’

Tess Marchant-Shapiro
Tess Marchant-Shapiro

The Supreme Court recently ruled that states may require members of the Electoral College to vote for the presidential candidate for whom their state elected in the popular vote.

The 9-0 decision gives states the authority to impose restrictions on the electors from those states, as well as to impose sanctions on those who fail to comply. From time to time, members of the Electoral College throughout U.S. history have “gone rogue” in voting for candidates who were not popularly elected in their state.

It most recently occurred during the 2016 presidential election, when a group of electors from states won by Hillary Clinton voted for other candidates, while a couple of electors from states won by Donald Trump also voted for other candidates.

Theresa Marchant-Shapiro, professor of political science, offered her insight and analysis during two recent radio interviews — WTIC (1080 AM) and WICC (600 AM).